World

Elon Musk 'secretly welcomed third child' with Neuralink executive

Tesla CEO is father of 12 children, including six whom he welcomed with different partners in past 5 years

By  Web Desk   |  
June 23, 2024
Tesla CEO Elon Musk andNeuralink executiveShivon Zilis can be seen hanging out with their with their twinsStrider (left) and Azure in this undated image. — X/WalterIsaacson

Tesla CEO Elon Musk welcomed a third child with Shivon Zilis, an executive at his brain-chip implant company, Neuralink, earlier this year, according to a report by Bloomberg.

The birth came after Musk, 52, revealed in 2022 that he and Zilis, 38, had welcomed a pair of twins — a boy and and a girl — named Strider and Azure, in November 2021, reportedly through in vitro fertilisation (IVF).

Advertisement

However, the gender and name of his third child with Zilis is still unknown, the New York Post reported.

Musk, who is one of the world's richest people, has fathered at least 12 children, six of whom he welcomed in the past five years.

The six children that he welcomed recently include his three children whom he shares with his former partner, Canadian popstar Grimes.

Elon Musk and Grimes arrive at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute Gala (Met Gala) in the Manhattan borough of New York, US, on May 7, 2018. — Reuters

She gave birth to their son X Æ A-Xii in May 2020 before welcoming a daughter, Exa Dark Sideræl, via surrogate in December 2021.

Their third child, Techno Mechanicus, was kept private until Musk's autobiography author Walter Isaacson referred to Grimes as "the mother of three of Musk's children" in his book.

Musk has previously joked that he's doing his "best to help the underpopulation crisis," which he views as "the biggest danger civilization faces."

Last week, Musk posted a chart claiming that Europe is suffering from a "fertility crisis," saying "civilization may end with a bang or with a whimper (in adult diapers)."

Meanwhile, the United Nations predicts the world population will continue to rise to 10 billion by the end of the century, despite global growth rates declining, according to the outlet.


Advertisement