Bali introduces 150,000 rupiah tax on incoming tourists

Foreign tourists arriving in Bali will need to pay the fee electronically through the "Love Bali" online portal

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Web Desk
Passengers arrive at the I Gusti Ngurah Rai International Airport in Badung, Bali, Indonesia, September 2, 2022. — REUTERS
Passengers arrive at the I Gusti Ngurah Rai International Airport in Badung, Bali, Indonesia, September 2, 2022. — REUTERS

Are you considering a getaway to Bali, the enchanting Indonesian paradise? Well, a new development might impact your travel plans. 

Bali has recently introduced a 150,000 rupiah ($10) tax on incoming tourists, a move aimed at preserving the unique cultural and environmental treasures that earned the island its moniker, the "Island of Gods."

"Why this levy?" you may wonder. 

Bali's acting governor, Sang Made Mahendra Jaya, explains that it's a strategic effort to safeguard the island's rich cultural tapestry and its pristine environment. In his words, "This levy is aimed at the protection of the culture and the environment in Bali."

To comply with this new regulation, foreign tourists arriving in Bali will need to pay the fee electronically through the "Love Bali" online portal. This levy is applicable to international tourists and those entering from other parts of Indonesia. However, domestic Indonesian tourists are exempt from this financial addition to their travel expenses.

Bali, known for its picturesque beaches and vibrant cultural scene, has been grappling with the delicate balance between preserving its allure and managing the influx of tourists. With nearly 4.8 million visitors between January and November last year, the island is leveraging its popularity to bolster its financial resources.

The move to impose a tax on tourists also comes in the wake of the island's commitment to upholding cultural respect. Recent incidents, including tourists posing inappropriately at sacred sites and engaging in disrespectful behavior, have prompted local authorities to take action. Last year, in response to these challenges, the local government published an etiquette guide for tourists.

As the island rebounds from the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, Bali is determined to ensure that visitors contribute not only to its economic prosperity but also to the preservation of its unique identity. 

So, if you're planning a trip to Bali, be prepared to embrace this new tax as a small but significant step towards the continued protection of the "Island of Gods."