James Webb Telescope: What unexpected object did expert discover in space?

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Web Desk
James Webb Space Telescope allows scientists to find unexpected objects in deep space. — Nasa, ESA, CSA, STScI
James Webb Space Telescope allows scientists to find unexpected objects in deep space. — Nasa, ESA, CSA, STScI

Astronomers, who were looking for new planet candidates in deep space with the help of the powerful James Webb Space Telescope, found a completely different celestial object which they said was not expected.

Scientists from three different universities gathered to observe the formation of new plants around infant stars employing the James Webb Telescope.

As an infant star stops accumulating interstellar molecular clouds, the remaining material forms a circle creating a protoplanetary disk — a mass of gas and dust used to form new planets.

The findings of the team were published in the Astronomical Journal in which scientists mentioned the protoplanetary disks of the stars HL Tau, SAO 206462, and MWC 758.

In a space.com report, University of Michigan astronomer Gabriele Cugno said in a statement: "Basically, in every disk we have observed with high enough resolution and sensitivity, we have seen large structures like gaps, rings and, in the case of SAO 206462, spirals."

Cugno, who led the study around infant star SAO 206462, said the team found a formation of the planet that they were not expecting to see at a distance of 450 light-years from Earth.

"Several simulations suggest that the planet should be within the disk, massive, large, hot and bright. But we didn't find it. This means that either the planet is much colder than we think, or it may be obscured by some material that prevents us from seeing it," Cugno said.

"What we have found is a different planet candidate, but we cannot tell with 100% certainty," he added, hoping further information to allow fuller understanding.

Cugno said: "The problem is, whatever we're trying to detect is hundreds of thousands, if not millions of times fainter than the star."