Chili peppers reduce mortality risk: study

Chili peppers are now a global phenomenon as people all around the world - from Cambodia to California, and from Birmingham, Alabama to Birmingham, United Kingdom - like to eat spicy food.

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Web Desk

For many years, chili has been hailed for its therapeutic properties, and now researchers have found that eating chili peppers regularly can cut the risk of death from heart disease and stroke.

Chili peppers are now a global phenomenon as people all around the world - from Cambodia to California, and from Birmingham, Alabama to Birmingham, United Kingdom - like to eat spicy food.

Throughout history, cultures have associated various health benefits with eating chili peppers.

However, as one of the authors of the recent study, Prof. Licia Iacoviello, explains, many of these beneficial properties have been ascribed "mostly on the basis of anecdotes or traditions, if not magic."

In more recent times, scientists have focused on capsaicin, the compound that gives chili their unmistakable punch.

According to the authors of the latest study, capsaicin "has been observed to favorably improve cardiovascular function and metabolic regulation in experimental and population studies."

Other researchers have concluded that capsaicin might be useful in the fight against neuropathic pain, arthritis, gastrointestinal disorders, and even cancer