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Friday May 07 2021
By
Web Desk

Video shows Israeli settler trying to occupy Palestinian woman's house by force

By
Web Desk
An Israeli settler was captured on video in the garden of a Palestinian family's home in Sheikh Jarrah. Photo: Screengrab via Twitter/Tamer Maqalda

A video recently went viral on social media in which an Israeli settler could be seen trying to forcefully occupy a Palestinian woman's house, Al-Jazeera reported.

The incident took place in Sheikh Jarrah, a neighbourhood in the occupied East Jerusalem.

In the video, the man — whose name was apparently Jakob — could be seen arguing with Mona al-Kurd, a young Palestinian woman when she protested against him trying to forcefully take over her house. The altercation took place in the garden of al-Kurd's house. 

"Jakob, you know this is not your house," al-Kurd could be heard telling the Israeli settler. 

In response, the man told her off by saying that she should not yell at him.

"Yes, but if I go, you don't go back. So what’s the problem? Why are you yelling at me?” I didn't do this," says the man, in a thick US accent.

When the woman protested against his actions, saying that he is trying to "steal her house," the man said: "If I don’t steal your house, someone else will steal it."

Visibly angered by the man's audacity, al-Kurd yelled at him, saying: "No one is allowed to steal it."

The man then says in Hebrew: "This is not mine in order to return it."

According to Al-Jazeera, some 3,000 Palestinians live in the Sheikh Jarrah neighbourhood. Many of them are descendants of people who were forced out during the ethnic cleansing of 1948.

Isreal has ordered Palestinian families, who have been living in Sheikh Jarrah for many generations, to evacuate their houses. A total of 58 Palestinians, 17 of whom are minors, are under threat of displacement so that the state could make way for Jewish settlements, the outlet said. 

To protest the move, Palestinian activists have started the trend "#SaveSheikhJarrah on social media in a bid to pressurise Israeli authorities to stop the neighbourhood's ongoing "nakba" (displacement).