pakistan
Friday Jul 30 2021
By
Web Desk

Pakistan, US NSAs discuss urgent need for reduction in violence in Afghanistan

By
Web Desk
Pakistan National Security Adviser Moeed Yusuf (left) and his US counterpart Jake Sullivan
Pakistan National Security Adviser Moeed Yusuf (left) and his US counterpart Jake Sullivan

  • NSA Moeed Yusuf meets with senior US officials during Washington visit.
  • Yusuf says he discussed bilateral, regional and global issues of mutual interest with US counterpart.
  • US NSA Jake Sullivan says he consulted Yusuf on regional connectivity and security.


WASHINGTON: Top national security officials of Pakistan and the US held a discussion on the ongoing situation in Afghanistan and the need for an urgent reduction in violence in the country.

National Security Adviser Moeed Yusuf is in the US to meet with senior US officials, lawmakers and think tanks to exchange views on the changing regional security situation.

His visit is part of high-level bilateral engagements between the two countries, read a statement.

“Had a positive follow-up meeting with NSA @JakeSullivan46 today in Washington. Took stock of progress made since our Geneva meeting & discussed bilateral, regional and global issues of mutual interest,” the Pakistan NSA tweeted.

He said they agreed to sustain the momentum in Pak-US bilateral cooperation.

On the other hand, US NSA Jake Sullivan said that he consulted Yusuf on regional connectivity and security and other areas of mutual cooperation.

“We discussed the urgent need for a reduction in violence in Afghanistan and a negotiated political settlement to the conflict,” he said in a statement after the meeting.

No favourites in Afghanistan

On Wednesday, a delegation of journalists from Afghanistan held an interaction with Prime Minister Imran Khan and asked him questions related to Pakistan’s stance on the current Afghan situation.

“We do not have any favourites in Afghanistan. Our policy is that whoever the people of Afghanistan choose, Pakistan will have the best relationship with them,” the prime minister had said.

The PM had said Pakistan was no longer pursuing its 90s’ policy of strategic depth in Afghanistan as his government strongly believed that Afghanistan can never be controlled from outside.

To a question on Taliban killing Afghans, he had said, “What Taliban are doing or not doing, has nothing to do with Pakistan. We are not responsible, nor are we spokesmen for the Taliban.”

He had termed as unfortunate the recent statements from the Afghan government officials accusing Pakistan of supporting the Taliban.

“No country has ever tried harder than Pakistan to bring the Taliban to the dialogue table -- first with the Americans and then with the Afghan government,” he had said, and mentioned that the efforts were also acknowledged by US Special Representative Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad.

PM Imran Khan had said a political compromise between the Afghan government and the Taliban to form an inclusive government was the only solution to achieve peace. “All we want is peace in Afghanistan,” he had added.