Sci-Tech
Saturday Jul 02 2022
By
Web Desk

Google will delete location history of abortion clinics to ensure privacy

By
Web Desk
The logo of Google is seen in Davos, Switzerland January 20, 2020. — Reuters/File
The logo of Google is seen in Davos, Switzerland January 20, 2020. — Reuters/File 

  • “We remain committed to protecting our users against improper govt demands for data," says Google Vice President Fitzpatrick.
  • Many women believe that data from such apps will be able to track their pregnancies, possible abortions.
  • Google says it will delete location history if their systems find anyone has gone to abortion clinics. 


Following America’s abortion laws being overturned by the US Supreme Court, Google announced in a statement that they will be deleting all location history and data when users visit medical facilities that offer abortion.

Although Google provides its users with the option to delete their data on their own, Google says if their systems find anyone has gone to abortion clinics, counselling centres, domestic violence shelters and other locations that can be deeply personal, it will automatically delete the location history from their system after the visit.

“We remain committed to protecting our users against improper government demands for data, and we will continue to oppose demands that are overly broad or otherwise legally objectionable”, said Google Senior Vice President Jen Fitzpatrick.

The recent controversy on social media also sparked confusion over apps that track menstrual cycles following America’s abortion ban, Neowin reported.  

Many women believe that the data from such apps will be able to track their pregnancies and possible abortions, which can put them in possible controversy with the law. However, Google announced that users that normally track their menstrual cycles in Google Fit and Fitbit will be able to delete multiple menstruation logs at a time in an upcoming update.

“We’re committed to delivering robust privacy protections for people who use our products, and we will continue to look for new ways to strengthen and improve these protections,” Fitzpatrick said.