Tiny robots cure pneumonia in rats

The "bioinspired microbots" interact with various microbes associated with certain illnesses in body

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A rat under a table. —  Unsplash
A rat under a table. —  Unsplash

In a new scientific breakthrough, scientists used little robots to cure pneumonia in rats.

The "bioinspired microbots" interact with various microbes associated with certain illnesses, said researchers in the journal Nature Materials.

While the technology is not yet launched and is in the proof-of-concept stage right now, experts say that the results of their work are quite promising.

Researchers hope that the technology can be explored more after which it can be effective for humans as well.

Microbots were developed from algae cells and covered with antibiotic nanoparticles made of tiny polymer spheres, reported Science Alert. The tiny warriors were then coated with neutrophils, which are a type of white blood cell.

The coating makes the bots secret spies, allowing the body to accept them as its own. The membrane of these bots fades away naturally over time, meaning they do not have to be removed.

This way treatment goes directly where it needs to. Scientists also found that this method was more effective than intravenous injections.