Friday, January 05, 2024
By
Web Desk

Meet Gaia, the world's deadliest cat, now residing at Utah's Hogle Zoo

Gaia, a 9-month-old black-footed cat, defies expectations with her petite 2.6-pound frame

By
Web Desk
Gaia, a black-footed cat, peers out from her enclosure at the Hogle Zoo in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2024. Gaia is 9 moths old and weighs 2.6 pounds. The cat’s breed is the smallest species of wild cat found in Africa.— Deseret News
Gaia, a black-footed cat, peers out from her enclosure at the Hogle Zoo in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2024. Gaia is 9 moths old and weighs 2.6 pounds. The cat’s breed is the smallest species of wild cat found in Africa.— Deseret News

Utah's Hogle Zoo proudly introduces its newest inhabitant, Gaia, a seemingly adorable cat with a killer instinct, Deseret News reported.

Described as "small in size but large in her feisty personality," Gaia, a 9-month-old black-footed cat, defies expectations with her petite 2.6-pound frame, making her a quarter of the size of an average house cat.

Despite her innocent appearance, Gaia belongs to the endangered black-footed cat species, renowned as the world's deadliest feline. PBS reports a staggering 60% success rate in their hunts, outclassing larger predators like lions. Even when compared to lions hunting in pairs or groups, the black-footed cat's success rate remains double.

This diminutive yet lethal cat, adorned with black or dark brown spots, typically prowls the African savannah at night. Gaia, with her big eyes and rounded ears, employs stealth and agility to capture prey, favouring a diet comprising locusts, birds, gerbils, and small rodents. 

Smithsonian Magazine notes their adept camouflage skills, allowing them to vanish into tall grasses during hunts, evading easy detection by cameras.

When not on their nightly prowl, black-footed cats seek refuge in burrows, caves, or dense shrubs during the day. Solitary creatures with a lifespan of up to 13 years in the wild and 15.6 years in captivity, these elusive felines inhabit regions of Namibia, central and southern Botswana, and South Africa.

While Gaia's cuteness is undeniable, PBS emphasises that black-footed cats, like her, are not suitable as pets. The Hogle Zoo invites visitors to witness Gaia's captivating presence in the Small Animal Building, urging them to maintain a serene environment to aid her acclimation.

As Gaia graces the Hogle Zoo with her presence, patrons are encouraged to appreciate the juxtaposition of her charming appearance with the deadly prowess that has earned the black-footed cat its title as the world's deadliest.