WATCH: Biggest snake species discovered in Amazon rainforest

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The biggest Anaconda species discovered in the Amazon Rainforest, the green Anaconda. — Wikipedia/File
The biggest Anaconda species discovered in the Amazon Rainforest, the green Anaconda. — Wikipedia/File

The Anaconda snake has been divided into two different species after experts found that the green anaconda, mostly found in South America's Amazon area is the longest of its species, growing to a length of around 26 feet, Fox News reported.

Earlier, it was believed that just one species of the massive snake existed; however, scientists have now divided the snake into two different species — northern and southern green anacondas.

A study published in the journal MDPI Diversity used genetic data from four recognised anaconda species across nine countries.

Researchers and explorers discovered that there is a 5.5% "genetically distinct" difference between the northern and southern green anacondas.

Humans and chimpanzees, in contrast, are just 2% different.

This finding was conducted by researchers using tissue and blood samples from green anacondas in Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela. 

It was exclusively reported by National Geographic for their forthcoming series, "Pole to Pole: With Will Smith".

The snakes were also closely examined to count their scales and record other physical traits that indicated "evolutionary divergence," NatGeo reported.

Geographic range is the primary species difference.

According to study co-author Bryan Fry, an explorer for National Geographic and biologist at the University of Queensland in Australia, the species difference is due to geographical changes.

The Amazon is made up of two separate basins: the large southern Amazon basin and the "much smaller" northern Orinoco basin.

Fry explained: "The southern green anaconda, Eunectes murinus, is found across a vast range spanning Brazil, Bolivia, Perú, and parts of French Guiana; by contrast, our newly described northern green anaconda, Eunectes akayima, is restricted to Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Suriname, Trinidad, Venezuela, and parts of French Guiana."