Candies or carbs: What's worse for your teeth?

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Web Desk
The image shows candies and pasta. — Unsplash
The image shows candies and pasta. — Unsplash

The "sticky and bready" fermentable carbohydrates such as white bread, pasta, chips, cereal, and crackers are worse than candies when it comes to deteriorating dental health,

Dental expert Whitney DiFoggio termed them "sneaky sugars", according to The New York Post.

"The reason fermentable carbohydrates are so bad for teeth is because they specifically break down into sugars while they're still being chewed in your mouth," she said.

The expert added that "those specific carbohydrates increase your chance of tooth decay because the saliva is working overtime to remove the gummy food off your teeth." This makes the mouth more acidic.

Furthermore, foods that "require heavier biting and chewing", such as crisp veggies like carrots and celery, as well as dark chocolate, are unexpectedly beneficial for your teeth since they are readily washed off.

Whole grains, on the other hand, are typically healthier for your dental health.

Having said that, she advises consuming all of the snacks at once if you need some sticky sweets or a bag of chips because eating throughout the day "is the absolute worst for teeth" as the mouth is constantly acidic.

She said, "If you want to eat these foods, it's okay. Try to eat them all at once, because then afterward, it gives your saliva time to neutralise the acidic pH in your mouth from all the sugar."

"So, eating a big meal of unhealthy stuff is healthier for your mouth than snacking throughout the day," she added.