Why is Mother's Day celebrated on different dates globally?

Some nations mark this special day on a fixed date, others undergo an annual shift in celebration day

By
Web Desk
Why is Mothers Day celebrated on different dates globally? — Reuters/File
Why is Mother's Day celebrated on different dates globally? — Reuters/File 

Mother's Day, a heartfelt tribute to mothers celebrated worldwide, is observed on different dates across different countries, but why?

While some nations annually mark this special day on a fixed date, others undergo an annual shift in celebration day.

Today, the United Kingdom honours mothers on Mother's Day, while in the United Arab Emirates, the festivities are set for March 21. Meanwhile, Ireland and Nigeria join the celebration this Sunday. 

Notably, the United States and India opt for a later commemoration, consistently on the second Sunday of May, this year falling on May 12.

Greek mythology traces this celebration back to the honouring of goddess Rhea, mother of Zeus, during spring. In the Middle East, nations like the UAE celebrate on March 21, aligning with the spring equinox.

Inspired by an early Christian festival, the UK and Ireland uphold the tradition of the fourth Sunday during Lent, usually falling in March.

The United States introduced Mother's Day in 1914, influencing many countries, including India, New Zealand, Australia, and Sri Lanka, to follow suit by celebrating on the second Sunday of May. 

Notably, unique variations exist, such as Thailand marking the occasion on August 12, Indonesia celebrating on December 22 with an inclusive approach, and France choosing the last Sunday of May.

In Argentina, a historical connection to the old celebration date of the Virgin Mary on the third Sunday of October persists. Russia joined the celebration in the 1940s, designating the last Sunday in November for Mother's Day.