Another pandemic? Brits advised to maintain distance from birds amid fears of next pandemic

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Web Desk
A person exits Bank underground station during morning rush hour, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in London, Britain, July 29, 2021. —Reuters
A person exits Bank underground station during morning rush hour, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in London, Britain, July 29, 2021. —Reuters

Following a controversy about a possible bird flu pandemic, UK health authorities have suggested citizens to maintain social distancing when in contact with wild birds, The US Sun reported.

The UK Health Security Authority (UKHSA) directive suggests people should retain a distance of two meters from birds, including common birds such as pigeons, swans, and gulls.

Alongside the RSPCA and the Animal and Plant Health Agency, the UKHSA sheds light on the fact that the risk of infection is lower when people refrain from touching any living bird, a said bird’s droppings or dead birds. 

On the one hand, the message “social distancing” should be focused on and this should concern the necessity of maintaining proper distance as per the recommendations.

Talks about bird flu can rise due to risks to cause general harm, as presents the high mortality rates in both avian and mammalian populations as an example. 

Although, in the past, avian flu, predominantly affected the poultry and the wild birds, nonetheless, the possibility of its transmitting to the humans is a very serious problem, with the average mortality rates of 60%.

While the world is experiencing a bird flu vaccine deficiency, it is evident that preventative measures must become a priority, and the government should mull over placing reserve flu vaccines available. 

With a case of bird flu already recorded in the UK and recent significant bird flu outbreaks in the Far East, surveillance and adherence to safe practices are key elements of the prevention and control measures related to zoonotic diseases .