Mysterious giant eggs found in Oklahoma may leave you stunned

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Web Desk
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This image released on March 12, 2024, shows unusual egg-like objects held by a person in Oklahoma. — Facebook/Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (ODWC)
This image released on March 12, 2024, shows unusual egg-like objects held by a person in Oklahoma. — Facebook/Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (ODWC)

There are a number of bizarre things happening around the world and one after the other it baffles netizens as people share their experiences with new encounters.

A post on Facebook went viral in which unusual eggs-like objects were recovered from a lake in Oklahoma.

The discovery was revealed by the Oklahoma Department of Wildfire Conservation on March 12, saying: "If you’re out boating somewhere like McGee Creek Reservoir you may notice these strange jelly-like balls hanging from submerged tree limbs."

The agency further clarified in the post refuting about any alien eggs: "These are Bryozoans, and they'll likely show up in large numbers this summer. Don’t be alarmed these microorganisms are native and are of no danger to you or wildlife. In fact, they are an indicator of good environmental quality and clear water!"

This image released on March 12, 2024, shows unusual egg-like objects in Oklahoma. — Facebook/Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (ODWC)
This image released on March 12, 2024, shows unusual egg-like objects in Oklahoma. — Facebook/Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (ODWC)

The pictures were so surprising that they alarmed the users with some of them calling them Godzilla eggs.

"All I can imagine is if I touched it or it touched me while in the water. I would freak out," a user wrote on Facebook.

The Oklahoma Department went on: "Individuals called 'zooids' continually clone themselves until they create a large mass where they filter tiny particles out of the water for food." 

It explained: "What makes them look and feel like jelly? Well, that is a soft shell made of a substance called chitin that can harden when dried up to preserve the organism until rehydrated."

"These animals are an important part of the ecosystem because they help clean the water and serve as prey for mussels, snails, and even small fish. They often spread through water connectivity or even by passing through the intestinal tract of fish or birds!"