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health
Friday Feb 12 2021
By
Web Desk

New study finds Pfizer vaccine has strong T-cell response to COVID-19 variants

By
Web Desk

  • Research paper highlights two doses of Pfizer vaccine triggered a strong T-cell response against UK and South African mutation of COVID-19
  • T-cells are white blood cells that act like soldiers to target and attack virus-infected cells in the body
  • AstraZaneca vaccine so far found to be effective against the UK variant, but yet to ascertain efficacy against South African mutation


The US-made Pfizer vaccine has shown a strong immune system response to two new variants of the deadly coronavirus, a recent study found.

The research paper highlighted that two doses of the Pfizer vaccine had triggered a strong T-cells response against the UK and South African mutation of the coronavirus, the Guardian reported.

T-cells are white blood cells that act like soldiers to target and attack virus-infected cells in the body.

Read more: Pakistan varsity starting trial of another coronavirus vaccine from China next week

Scientists found that the response in the body was high enough to protect most people from falling ill, especially after a second jab has been administered, the report added.

“It [the vaccine] may not necessarily protect you against infection, but it’s very likely that this first dose will make it much easier for your immune system to make a good response the next time around,” said William James, a professor of virology at the University of Oxford, who was involved in the study, as quoted by the Guardian.

“We think this is why that second dose produces such a good strong antibody response, because the T cells are already there, ready to react.”

Deborah Dunn-Walters, a professor of immunology at the University of Surrey, told the publication: “It does look like good news and suggests it is really important that people go back for their second dose of vaccine.”

Read more: Sindh reports sweeping irregularities in dispensing China's Sinopharm vaccine against COVID-19

Meanwhile, the manufactures of the AstraZeneca vaccine have said it could take between six to nine months to produce Covid-19 vaccines that are effective against new variants of the coronavirus, reports the Guardian.

The company’s vaccine has so far been found to be effective against the UK variant but it has yet to ascertain efficacy against the South African mutation.