health
Friday Jul 22 2022
By
Web Desk

HIV vaccine one step closer to reality, researchers say

By
Web Desk
A medical worker holds a syringe with Sputnik V (Gam-COVID-Vac) vaccine against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) before administering injection at a vaccination centre in a shopping mall in Saint Petersburg, Russia February 24, 2021. — Reuters/File
A medical worker holds a syringe with Sputnik V (Gam-COVID-Vac) vaccine against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) before administering injection at a vaccination centre in a shopping mall in Saint Petersburg, Russia February 24, 2021. — Reuters/File

Doctors in Israel have developed a treatment which could potentially cure the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), if administered in the form of an injection.

The doctors engineered type B white blood cells outside of the body, a process which has only been successful a few times, according to Dr Adi Barzel of Tel Aviv University. 

These engineered cells cause the immune system to spread antibodies which neutralise HIV.

“Based on this study, we can expect that over the coming years we will be able to produce a medication for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), additional infectious diseases and certain types of cancer caused by a virus, such as cervical cancer, head and neck cancer and more,” Dr Barzel said in a university release.

Currently, while there are several treatments which can lessen the effects of the potentially fatal virus, there is no permanent cure. This new form of treatment, however, provides hope for those affected by HIV.