German man vaccinated for COVID-19 over 200 times!

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Web Desk
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A representational image showing a doctor administers a vaccine via a syringe. — Unsplash
A representational image showing a doctor administers a vaccine via a syringe. — Unsplash

An elderly German man has reportedly been vaccinated 217 times for COVID-19 without experiencing any side effects leaving doctors scratching their heads.

According to the BBC, a case documented in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal revealed that a 62-year-old man from Germany received the vaccinations privately against medical advice within 29 months.

Researchers from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg revealed that the man appears to have suffered no ill effects.

"We learned about his case via newspaper articles," Dr Kilian Schober, from the university's microbiology department, said. "We then contacted him and invited him to undergo various tests in Erlangen. He was very interested in doing so."

The man provided fresh blood and saliva samples to researchers for tests. They also tested frozen blood samples he had stored in recent years.

Dr Schober said: "We were able to take blood samples ourselves when the man received a further vaccination during the study at his own insistence.

"We were able to use these samples to determine exactly how the immune system reacts to the vaccination."

The Magdeburg public prosecutor collected evidence for 130 jabs, allegedly involving fraud, but no criminal charges were brought.

CVOID vaccines cannot cause infection but can teach the body how to fight the disease.

Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) vaccines provide the body with genetic code from the virus, enabling the immune system to recognise and fight COVID-19 for real.

Schober's concerns about fatigued cells from repeated immune system stimulation were dismissed by researchers who found no evidence in the man of ever being infected with COVID-19.

The researchers said: "Importantly, we do not endorse hyper-vaccination as a strategy to enhance adaptive immunity."

The tests were insufficient to draw significant conclusions or make recommendations for the general public.

"Current research indicates that a three-dose vaccination, coupled with regular top-up vaccines for vulnerable groups, remains the favoured approach," they say on the university's website. "There is no indication that more vaccines are required."