Flight safety concerns prompt advisory for pilots; what does it say

Door of Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 Max 9 blew out in January

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Web Desk
The union also urged its members to not be afraid. — Reuters
The union also urged its members to not be afraid. — Reuters

Pilots in the US have raised an alarm over the issues concerning flight safety and negligence, as there have been a number of mid-air incidents with the recent one relating to the Boeing 737 Max 9 in January and several others of United Airlines last month.

The Allied Pilots Association said in a message to its members: "While United Airlines is currently under public and government scrutiny, it could just as easily be American Airlines."

The union also urged its members to not be afraid of reporting any safety issues they may encounter and to resist any kind of intimidation.

"As the last link in the safety chain, our passengers and crew depend on us to be the strongest link in that chain," the message added.

They drew the attention of their members to the disastrous trends of leaving tools behind in the aircraft wheel wells and the collisions that involve planes being towed on the ground.

A door of Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 Max 9 blew out in January. — Reuters
A door of Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 Max 9 blew out in January. — Reuters

They also highlighted the "pressure to return aircraft to line service to maintain on-time performance" on the pilots.

On January 5, a major mid-flight accident occurred in which a door of an Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 Max 9 blew out.

In March, there were nearly a dozen of aircraft problems witnessed by the United Airlines of engine malfunctioning as the last one occurred in a Japan-bound flight where aircraft UA35 was to leave San Francisco International Airport.

The Boeing 777-200 was sent to the gate and one of the passengers told the San Francisco Chronicle that the pilot made an announcement explaining that "the right engine is not working."

On the same day the CEO of the company, Scott Kirby, told customers about how flying with their company was safe.