Trump overshadows first Republican primary debate despite no-show

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Web Desk
Tucker Carlson, left, and former president Donald Trump at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey, in July 2022. — The Telegraph
Tucker Carlson, left, and former president Donald Trump at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey, in July 2022. — The Telegraph

Former President Donald Trump seized the spotlight even without stepping onto the stage at the opening Republican primary debate of the 2024 election cycle. 

Trump, who leads the polls among the Republican contenders, opted to forgo the Milwaukee event, denying his fellow candidates the chance to challenge him in person. Yet, his presence remained palpable, largely due to his ongoing legal battles and numerous prosecutions.

Though absent, Donald Trump's legal entanglements took centrestage during the debate, with Fox News moderators directing questions towards his legal woes. His indictment on allegations of orchestrating a scheme to tamper with the 2020 election, which he lost to Joe Biden, remained a central topic of discussion. 

Scheduled to surrender to authorities in Atlanta following the debate today, Donald Trump's legal predicament loomed large.

In a campaign email prior to the debate, the 77-year-old former president remarked, "I have bigger things to focus on than debating candidates who are polling at one percent on the night before my wrongful arrest." Trump's statement underscored his desire to prioritise his legal battles over political sparring with low-polling opponents.

Despite his absence, the debate provided a platform for Florida Governor Ron DeSantis, a top contender vying to challenge Donald Trump's dominance. DeSantis aimed to present himself as a candidate who earns support rather than expecting it handed to him.

The event also allowed less prominent contenders to introduce themselves and stake a claim for potential roles in a future Trump administration. 

With four months remaining until the first nomination votes in Iowa and New Hampshire, analysts highlighted that the race's outcome remains uncertain. 

In the words of former US senator Judd Gregg, "Somebody's going to catch the wave, and when they do, Trump's going to have a race on his hands."