Can Elon Musk's XMail drive Google's Gmail out of users' devices?

By
Web Desk
Tech billionaire Elon Musk gestures in this undated photo. —AFP
Tech billionaire Elon Musk gestures in this undated photo. —AFP

In a groundbreaking announcement, tech mogul Elon Musk, the visionary behind X (formerly Twitter), has lifted the curtain on his latest project: XMail, a revolutionary email service poised to challenge Google's longstanding supremacy in the market.

Musk, through his social media platform X, teased the imminent arrival of XMail, keeping details about its features, launch date, and pricing under wraps while dropping hints of integration with the X app.

This revelation coincides with a surge of anxiety among Gmail users, triggered by a viral hoax image circulating on X and other platforms, falsely claiming Google's plan to shut down its acclaimed email service by August 2024.

A screengrab of an X post showing Elon Musks confirmation that XMail is coming. —X@elonmusk
A screengrab of an X post showing Elon Musk's confirmation that XMail is coming. —X@elonmusk

 Despite Google swiftly debunking the rumour and reaffirming Gmail's permanence, some users remain intrigued by XMail as a potential alternative.

XMail is part of Musk's ambitious strategy to transform X into an "everything app," a comprehensive hub for diverse online services. Earlier this year, Musk introduced ChatGPT, a conversational AI assistant, on X, receiving both praise for innovation and criticism for its potential to disseminate misinformation.

Experts speculate that XMail could disrupt the email service industry dominated by Gmail, boasting over 1.8 billion active users worldwide in 2024, according to Demand Sage. 

Social media strategist Rhea Freeman acknowledges the potential of XMail but raises concerns about user trust, data protection compliance, and competition with established services like Outlook, Yahoo, and ProtonMail.

Notably, the connection between XMail and xAI, Musk's AI-focused company founded in 2023, remains unclear. Responsible for projects like Neuralink and Starlink, xAI's involvement raises questions about the development and technological prowess behind XMail.

As the tech titan keeps the public guessing about XMail's release date, anticipation and scepticism loom among users, with some eager to embrace Musk's latest creation, while others remain loyal to the reliability of Gmail for personal and professional communication.

The fate of XMail hangs in the balance, awaiting its potential ascent as a formidable competitor in the dynamic realm of email services.