Can't connect right now! retry
entertainment
Tuesday Mar 24 2020
By
Web Desk

Mark Wahlberg's criminal past led to him detaching from Hollywood

By
Web Desk

Mark Wahlberg's criminal past led to him detaching from Hollywood

American actor Mark Wahlberg may be a recognized name for Hollywood but the star has made a conscious effort to keep himself detached from the rest. 

The 48-year-old Spenser: Confidential actor told The Guardian in an interview that despite him being part of the industry, he likes to keep himself at a distance from Hollywood’s social scene.

“I’m so out of the loop with Hollywood. Other than working, I go to the supermarket. I don’t go to dinner parties on the scene or screenings. I live in Beverly Hills, but it could easily be the English countryside because I don’t see anyone and I don’t do anything,” he said.

“I don’t go to awards unless I have a movie in them. I go to bed early, I get up early, I take my kids to school and I’m with my wife if I’m not I’m working,” he added.

Wahlberg’s current take on life may be owing to the violent past he was part of as a child, being the youngest of nine children and encountering numerous struggles and challenges on the way.

“When I walked out my door — violence is also all that was there,” he said and added that he had “always been in trouble, and I was kind of little. In the circumstances where I was being preyed upon, at times, I had to protect and defend myself. It’s not an easy thing to navigate as a teenage kid who’s 5’2, 120 pounds, with grown men.”

The actor is also conscious of the slipups he made in life, especially during his days of yore, as he had once found himself locked up after assaulting a man while under the influence of drugs back in 1988.

“I made a lot of terrible mistakes and I paid for those mistakes dearly.”

“I took it upon myself to own up to my mistakes and go against the grain and not be a part of the gang any more — to say that I was going to go and do my own thing, Which made it 10 times more difficult to walk from my home to the train station, to go to school, to go to work,” he added.

“I do think the one thing I have to my advantage is that I have all this real-life experience that I can apply to my work. I think audiences can definitely sense authenticity. But that came with a real price,” he continued.